By Katelyn Needham/ editor-in-chief

Clubs provide a way to make meeting new people easier, and four campuses have new clubs for students to join. 

All five campuses have new organizations that became available this semester.

“Student activities says that students who are more involved in school and clubs are more likely to keep going with their education,” NE student Tai Kapaji said. “Clubs are also here to have fun and enjoy the experience more here at TCC. It’s about finding a club that works for you.”

Kapaji is president of The Human Experience, one of the new clubs available on NE. The Intersectional Feminist Club, United States of American Muslims and the Juggling and Flow Arts Club are also new to NE this semester.

The Intersectional Feminist Club holds discussions about feminist topics and monthly documentary movie nights and is also a planned parenthood generation chapter, said club president and NE student Ashley Turner.

The Human Experience uses discussion to work on skills like leadership, public speaking and active listening, Kapaji said.

“I know that the purpose of the club seems a little ambiguous,” he said. “But that’s because I want the topics that we discuss to be broad and thought-provoking. I would eventually like to add other elements, like monthly pizza parties, fundraisers and community service projects. But right now, I’m just focused on getting more people.”

TR Campus has new clubs as well, Roteract and the Environmental Club.

“Our club is a third-party club established by Rotary International,” Roteract president and TR student David Dominguez said. “It is found in many different countries and on all kinds of campuses. The community work that we do brings us closer, and we are very open to what students want to do.”

South Campus has six new clubs, Amtgard Larping, Association for Mindfulness and Well-Being, Psi Beta, Korean Interest Association, Beta Psi and Victims to Victors.

“It is really brand new,” Victims to Victors adviser and South administrative assistant Angela Carr said. “It was formed to help individuals who have been victimized in any way, both current or in their childhood. It’s to increase awareness not only at the college but community level. This club can help them know that there are other people who identify with them and they no longer have to suffer in silence.”

The Korean Interest Association aims to spread awareness and information about the Korean culture. Amtgard Larping gives students an opportunity to live-action role play with padded swords and shields.

“They are a student group who express interest in the Korean culture,” adviser and coordinator of supplemental instruction Phong Do said. “Interestingly enough, none of the students in the club are Korean, and I think that shows that our student population is open to learning about other cultures.”

SE now provides the new organization ELLAS, Encouraging Latinas to Lead, Achieve and Succeed, a new organization that is dedicated to Latina women.

“ELLAS provides support, training and guidance to students as they pursue their academic and professional goals at TCC,” ELLAS chair Kecia Baker said.

To sign up or ask questions about a club, students may contact their campus student activities office.

To start a new club on campus, students must have a faculty/staff adviser, a completed application, at least seven student members, a constitution and approval from the campus student activities office.

“It’s hard getting attention when there are so many clubs fighting for members,” Kapaji said. “I guess that’s the biggest challenge of starting this club — convincing prospective members that it’s worth checking out. Anyway, we’ve only had two meetings so far, so I’m looking forward to seeing the club grow.”