By Kathryn Kelman/editor-in-chief

SE Campus theater students will bring a comedic tale of marital discourse run amok to life Oct. 3-6 in the campus’ C.A. Roberson Theatre. 

Playwright David Lindsay-Abaire’s Wonder of the World has to do with fate and destiny, said SE drama associate professor Angela Inman.

“Life sometimes throws us random curves, and we have to take that and make the best of it,” she said. “I think that’s pretty much what it’s about.” 

Throughout the play, the lead character Cass wants to take control of her life and do the things she’s always wanted to do but hasn’t had the chance to. But after a series of crazy things, she realizes she can’t control life and has to take what’s given to her and “run with it,” Inman said.

The play is a comedy, but the style of it isn’t one SE’s theater department has done in some time, she said. 

“We thought it was time in the rotation to do something in this style of comedy, and it’s really good for the acting student because comedy is actually really hard to do,” she said. 

Pulling off a comedy takes a lot of work and planning to nail down the right timing, and so much of the comedy is tied up in Lindsay-Abaire’s script, said SE student Jason Jordan who plays Kip, Cass’ husband. 

“If we can’t get the text right, the jokes won’t land,” he said. 

Memorizing lines and perfecting their delivery is the primary focus of the cast members as they prepare for opening night, Jordan said.

Wonder of the World features more adult comedy as the script incorporates strong language and adult themes like suicide and sexual deviance. It is recommended for mature audiences. 

“The play itself is a comedy, farce,” Jordan said. “To put it in simple terms, it’s full of ridiculous situations with almost as ridiculous characters.”

SE student Haley Davila, who plays Cass, said the play is “so dramatic it’s hilarious because it’s so ridiculous.”

“It’s been a lot of fun working with this [play], and I love the cast,” she said. 

Wonder of the World opens with Davila’s character leaving her husband Kip, Jordan’s character, after Cass realizes her life isn’t what she wanted. 

“The two met in high school when Cass was working as a lifeguard and saved Kip from drowning,” Jordan said.

 Their characters have a long history together, having been married for around seven years in the setting of the play, Jordan said. 

“We use our already established friendship as a basis for our characters,” he said. “In that aspect, that has really helped us with the characters.”  

Both also relate to aspects of their characters’ personalities, which has also helped them prepare. 

“When I was first reading the script, even before auditions and everything, I saw myself in the writing,” Davila said. “At one point, she [Cass] bounces on the bed, and I remember being like ‘I do that at home!’ so I really saw myself in my character already.” 

This takes Davila a step further as to what she can do with her character, she said. 

Another interesting aspect of the show, according to Jordan, is how the play lacks a definitive bad guy. 

“Every character in the show has justifiable reasons for what they’re doing,” he said. “Every character, in one way or another, is relatable, and that’s something you don’t see very often in a lot of shows, especially in comedies.”

Wonder of the World has something for everyone, Davila said. 

“People should come see the play because it is hilarious and we offer so many exciting things in the show,” she said. “It’s full of energy. It’s full of life.” 

Performances for Wonder of the World will start at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 3-6 with an additional 1:30 p.m. matinee show Oct. 5. Admission is free for TCC students, faculty and staff; $3 for non-TCC students and senior citizens; and $6 general admission. 

For more information, contact the SE box office at se.theater@tccd.edu or 817-515-3599.