The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Students observe America firsthand on historical trip

Paul Revere is immortalized on his famous ride to warn the revolutionists that the British were coming. The American hero was just one of many sites visited by students who toured the birthplace of American history last fall. Another trip will be offered to all TCC students next fall.  Photo courtesy Shannon Smith
Paul Revere is immortalized on his famous ride to warn the revolutionists that the British were coming. The American hero was just one of many sites visited by students who toured the birthplace of American history last fall. Another trip will be offered to all TCC students next fall. Photo courtesy Shannon Smith

By Sharon Murra-Kapon/south news editor

Paul Revere is immortalized on his famous ride to warn the revolutionists that the British were coming. The American hero was just one of many sites visited by students who toured the birthplace of American history last fall. Another trip will be offered to all TCC students next fall.  Photo courtesy Shannon Smith
Paul Revere is immortalized on his famous ride to warn the revolutionists that the British were coming. The American hero was just one of many sites visited by students who toured the birthplace of American history last fall. Another trip will be offered to all TCC students next fall. Photo courtesy Shannon Smith

American history and literature came alive for a group of TCC students when they traveled to Boston last fall.

Under the supervision of Bryan Johnson, assistant professor of U.S. government and history, and Shannon Smith, assistant professor of English, 10 Cornerstone students witnessed some of the most famous historical sites in the United States.

Another trip is planned for next fall.

The trip lasted four days and included visits to Old North Church, Lexington Bridge, Freedom Trail, House of the Seven Gables and Salem Witchcraft Memorial and cemetery.

They also went to the church of the presidents and saw the burial site of John Adams, John Quincy Adams and their wives.

“ It was really cool. It’s the closest you can get to an American president,” Smith said. “ It was a very honoring and humbling time—one of my favorite places.”

On their visit to Walden Pond, the group found the water was so clear they could see all the way to the bottom.

Although the temperature was 45 degrees, people were still swimming, Smith said.

The tour included a visit to Paul Revere’s House, the last house built in the 17th century.

A tombstone marks the resting place of the American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, best known for The Scarlet Letter. Students in the South Campus Cornerstone program visited these sites last fall. The Boston excursion is expanding, so all TCC students can participate in the study trip planned for the fall 2007 semester.  Photo courtesy Shannon Smith
A tombstone marks the resting place of the American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, best known for The Scarlet Letter. Students in the South Campus Cornerstone program visited these sites last fall. The Boston excursion is expanding, so all TCC students can participate in the study trip planned for the fall 2007 semester. Photo courtesy Shannon Smith

Built in 1723, the Old North Church, the oldest church in Boston, was part of Revere’s legendary “midnight ride” warning Samuel Adams and John Hancock the British were coming.

The group also visited the Orchard House, where the remains of American writers such as Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Louisa May Alcott rest at the Author’s Ridge Cemetery.

The group also visited Harvard University.

“ The trips are incredible because Boston is so much different from Texas,” Smith said.

“ It is a city of young, professional people, very urban, and it has so many cultures and diversity,” she said.

Smith said students were exposed to a different way of living and a place rich in culture and history.

“ The Boston trip was a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” Laura Snider, South Campus student, said.

“ Taking a trip like this certainly makes us expand our horizons and open our minds to new experiences,” she said.

Snider said the trip was not only educational but fun, and she said the whole group bonded with each other.

The trip was originally offered to Cornerstone students only; however, the next trip in October will be open to all TCC students.

Smith said students might read history and literature books, but when they stand at the actual places that made history, education comes alive.

“ We learn to appreciate American history better,” she said.

For more information about the Boston trip, e-mail Smith at shannon.smith@tccd.edu or Johnson at bryan.johnson@tccd.edu.

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