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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Novel adaptation to recall childhood memories in play

Scout and Jem discuss the activities going on during a trial their father is conducting in To Kill a Mockingbird. Sarah Moss, an eighth grade student at Chisholm Trail Middle School, plays Scout, and Hunter Vivirito, a seventh grader at Chisholm Trail, plays Jem in the play adapted from the award-winning novel by Harper Lee.  Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian
Scout and Jem discuss the activities going on during a trial their father is conducting in To Kill a Mockingbird. Sarah Moss, an eighth grade student at Chisholm Trail Middle School, plays Scout, and Hunter Vivirito, a seventh grader at Chisholm Trail, plays Jem in the play adapted from the award-winning novel by Harper Lee. Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian

By Sarah McVean/nw news editor

Scout and Jem discuss the activities going on during a trial their father is conducting in To Kill a Mockingbird. Sarah Moss, an eighth grade student at Chisholm Trail Middle School, plays Scout, and Hunter Vivirito, a seventh grader at Chisholm Trail, plays Jem in the play adapted from the award-winning novel by Harper Lee.  Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian
Scout and Jem discuss the activities going on during a trial their father is conducting in To Kill a Mockingbird. Sarah Moss, an eighth grade student at Chisholm Trail Middle School, plays Scout, and Hunter Vivirito, a seventh grader at Chisholm Trail, plays Jem in the play adapted from the award-winning novel by Harper Lee. Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian

The novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee has sold more than 30 million copies in 13 countries and won the 1961 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Adapted by Christopher Sergel into a play, To Kill a Mockingbird will run at Theatre Northwest Oct. 10-14.

Students from Chisholm Trail Middle School perform in the production because of the collaboration between director Brent Alford and Nick Kougias, drama teacher for Northwest ISD and lead actor.

The play takes place in the Jean Louise Finch’s memories of 1935 Maycomb, Ala., when Jean Louise, her brother Jem and friend Dill are shaken up with the realization of prejudice in their small town.

Kougias plays the role of Atticus Finch, a lawyer of principle and integrity, who is asked to defend a black man who has been wrongfully accused of raping a white woman.

“ Even though he knows he is going to lose the trial, he still defends him [Tom Robinson],” he said.

“ I do think that is one thing really endearing about this character, just his whole philosophy and approach on how he addresses things,” he said.

Hunter Vivirito, a Chisholm Trail Middle School seventh grader, plays Jem Finch.

“ My character is the son of a warrior [Atticus Finch] who is defending a black man who has to put his word against two white men,” he said.

“ [Jem Finch] is actually a child in the beginning, but as he goes on throughout the play, he grows up and matures and realizes about the racism going on in the world. He also has an annoying little sister,” he said.

Sarah Moss, an eighth grade student, plays the role of Scout Finch, who is the younger Jean Louise and Atticus’ daughter.

“ I’m the little annoying sister to Jem, and he doesn’t like me getting involved with him and his friends,” she said.

“ Atticus is my dad, and we have a very good father/daughter relationship,” she said.

Tony Boone plays Tom Robinson, the black man accused of rape.

“ Tom tries to help whomever he can,” he said.

Boone said Tom is a married father of two. He lost the use of one arm at 12, when it was stuck in a cotton gin.

“ He gets into this whole fix with Mayella because I think she has a thing for him, and her dad catches her in the act of trying to mess around with him,” he said.

“ But Tom is innocent and gets taken advantage of. The trial takes place because of Tom,” he said.

For this production, the stage has been extended into the audience. Scenery and lighting were designed by David Opper.

Production stage managers Anthony Todd and Rebecca Weiner assisted Alford throughout the production schedule.

To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story of Scout and Jem during the great depression in the South. Through the experience, the siblings learn racism and bigotry rule in their small Alabama town.

“ It makes me happy to entertain people. I want to make them branch from reality for a second,” actor Danney Clarkson said. “Being on stage is the highest you can get without all the goofy after effects.”

Shows run Wednesday-Saturday 7:30-9:30 p.m. and a Sunday matinee 2-4 p.m. The play will be in the NW

Campus Theatre (WTLO 1108).

General admission is $6; students and seniors $3, and TCC students, faculty and staff are free.

Reservations are required and seating is limited. Contact the box office at 817-515-7724.

This production is not appropriate for children under the age of 12.

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