The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

CD Review

CD+Review

By Frankie Farrar-Helm/entertainment editor

The Enigma of Life, the fifth album released by Norwegian symphonic metal band Sirenia on Jan. 21, is a creative piece of art.

Sirenia has pioneered the gothic metal scene by incorporating a plethora of instruments and symphonic melodies in its previous albums. The Enigma of Life is its best yet.

The band was formed in 2001 when guitarist Morten Veland from Stavanger, Norway, left his band Tristania and formed Sirenia. Veland is the guitarist, additional vocalist, bassist, drummer and keyboardist — a one-man show. Spanish X Factor contestant Pilar Gimenez Garcia, professionally known as Ailyn, joined the band as lead vocalist in 2008.

The first track, “The End of It All,” is a very symphonic track. The classical voice of Ailyn flows with Veland’s heavy guitar work making it a beautiful, melodic metal jam. His growling vocals are an interesting addition — another original musical element.

The title track, “The Enigma of Life,” is another beautiful symphonic piece. In addition to the euphoric choir, Ailyn’s vocals are more heavenly than anywhere else on the album. Her jaw-dropping voice cries out hopeless lyrics: “I know the darkness will break me and you cannot save me, can’t catch my fall … I feel the sorrow embrace me, this life depraves me I’m lost forevermore.” Veland follows with a gripping, melodic guitar solo. The keyboard finishes the track as it started, slow and classical.

A majority of The Enigma of Life is dark and ominous. A few songs, such as “Winter Land” and “This Lonely Lake,” have faster beats and lighter guitar use, making them less gloomy and more cheerful.

Despite the overall melancholy throughout the album, Veland’s atmospheric approach is captivating. The choir and well-balanced duet pieces between Ailyn and Veland close the songs with a bang.

Fans looking for heavy, earth-shaking, ear-bleeding death metal may not enjoy this album, but if enjoying a more calming, symphonic type of metal is possible, this album is highly recommended.

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