The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Artist displays wax-pastel drawings on South Campus, offers advice to novice artists

By Mona Lisa Tucker/south news editor

Enrico Riley was soft-spoken and reserved until he entered the Carillon Gallery on South Campus where his works of art are on display.

Each piece of art has meaning, but he particularly likes his drawing of a dancer, he said.

“I like it quite a bit because, like a lot of this new work, it reminds me of my young son Alex, who is three years old, the way he moves and his energy,” he said.

Riley said his father had a talent for drawing, so he grew up in a home where art was displayed and celebrated, he said.

Head, Enrico Riley, wax on paper. Photos by Martina M. Treviño/The Collegian
Head, Enrico Riley, wax on paper. Photos by Martina M. Treviño/The Collegian

“It was magical for me and my two brothers to watch my father draw and to make these art objects,” he said.

One day, he realized he had inherited his father’s talent. Therefore, he started drawing and then ultimately entered Dartmouth College, he said.

Fine arts chair Joshua Goode became familiar with Riley through other painters, especially from New York and Boston, whom he greatly respects, he said.

“It’s always great to see new perspectives on painting and on the art world,” he said.

Riley is an intelligent artist and painter who has a tremendous background, Goode said. He has a Bachelor of Arts from Dartmouth and Master of Fine Arts from Yale, Goode said.

Figure in a Doorway, Enrico Riley, wax on paper
Figure in a Doorway, Enrico Riley, wax on paper

Goode wanted Riley to come to TCC to inspire students by letting them know these opportunities are accessible to them, and it’s not something that’s out of reach. If students work hard, they can achieve these things, Goode said.

“Enrico is a great example of that. He’s a very hard worker. He spends long hours in the studio, is very dedicated to his craft of painting and he’s a remarkable teacher, as well,” he said.

Riley spent 14 hours on campus, working with students and giving them individual critiques. He kept a smile on his face and never complained, Goode said.

The students are excited to now do new work in the studio, Goode said.

“I think it was a great visit and a great opportunity for the students to see someone who is on such a high-profile stage,” Goode said.

Riley said to really pursue anything, students will need to spend time alone practicing and working.

In a way, it’s almost like becoming a producer more than a consumer, he said.

“And it’s important to be OK with that,” he said.

Screen Shot 2013-05-01 at 11.20.38 AMSouth student Shaundaydara Warren never met an artist before. Riley looked at the art she had done and showed her some different techniques, she said.

“It was great,” she said.

Derek Jump, another South student, said by getting to know Riley and talking with him, he discovered Riley had a lot of depth in his paintings that’s really not seen when walking into the gallery.

Now when Jump goes in the show, it seems to get better and better, he said.

“Working with him was a good experience. He has a different perspective from our art down here,” he said.

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