The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

TCC will join smokeout to help quitters

By Michael Burns/reporter

TCC campuses will participate in the 35th annual Great American Smokeout Nov. 18.

Since 1975, the American Cancer Society has spearheaded the non-smoking movement that helps people understand the dangers of smoking and the challenges of quitting, according to its website. The Great American Smokeout encourages smokers to take a day off from smoking and to develop a plan to quit.

To have the best chances of quitting successfully, “you need to know what you’re up against, what your options are, and where to go for help,” the website says.

TR Campus will have a table in TRTR Main Street with information on smoking dangers and quitting, said TR health services coordinator Veronica Warrior.

SE Campus will provide information and tips to quit smoking 10 a.m.-2 p.m. in the Main Commons. For more information, contact Kristian Harvey at 817-515-3591.

NE health services will present a non-smoking fair 11 a.m.-1 p.m. in the NSTU cafeteria to help smokers kick the habit.

Registered nurse and NE coordinator of health services Pat Marling encourages students to attend the NE Great American Smokeout.

“Quit smoking, and we can help,” she said.

Students will be provided with tips and resources to help quit smoking. A model of a smoker’s lung will be shown to expose the destruction inhaled smoke does to the lungs.

Marling said that people can’t stop smoking because they develop a perceived need to have something in their mouths. Along with brochures and informational booths, gum and lollipops will be handed out to keep the mouth busy as alternatives to cigarettes.

According to the society’s website, an estimated 46 million adults in the U.S. currently smoke, and approximately half will die prematurely from smoking. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for men and women. More than 80 percent of lung cancer cases are thought to result from smoking and correlated to cause nearly one in five deaths in the U.S.

Marling said all students are welcome and encouraged to bring a friend who would like more information about quitting smoking.

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