The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

‘Boomerang kids’ try going home again

By Montreal Spencer/south news editor

South Campus student Amy Norwood goes over her textbook with her father. Students have been moving back home to cope with the expenses of living on their own.  Photo by Montreal Spencer/The Collegian
South Campus student Amy Norwood goes over her textbook with her father. Students have been moving back home to cope with the expenses of living on their own. Photo by Montreal Spencer/The Collegian

After graduating from high school, some students can’t wait to get out on their own and be free of their parents’ rules.

However, with that newfound freedom comes newfound responsibilities. If students aren’t ready for those responsibilities, they might be on their way back to their parents’ houses — and not just for a visit.

A common name for people who move out of their parents’ houses and then move right back in again is boomerang kids or the boomerang generation.

South Campus student Larry Douglas knows firsthand about being a boomerang kid and how not being ready to move out can be hazardous.

“I moved out at 17 and had a new refreshing, liberating feeling. The money started getting tight, and that responsibility of paying your own bills if you are not ready for it will sink you down,” he said.

Douglas said he thought he was ready to live on his own, but he wasn’t. Then the bills started getting behind.

“An eviction notice will really set reality in,” he said. “My mama wouldn’t never evict me.

He said the transition back to his parents took away his newfound freedom.

“I was used to having people come over all the time and coming in the house when I wanted,” he said. 

Douglas said that type of stuff wouldn’t fly with his parents. After moving back with his parents for a while, he learned from his past and now is back on his own.

“I took my time getting back ready, so now I’m on my own again and more prepared,” he said.

NE Campus student Josh Hamilton said he went to work and moved out because he liked his freedom. He chose to quit his job and go back home to focus on school.

“It was a weird and nostalgic feeling seeing all the changes to the house since I’d been gone. I felt like I did when I was younger, but I definitely liked being on my own better,” he said.

Hamilton moved out of his parents’ house again after living there for a year and a half to get that freedom he once had, and he still goes to school.

South student Amy Norwood was living the independent lifestyle working retail making decent money, but her dad always wanted her to go to school.

“My dad would always offer to pay for everything if I moved back home and went to school,” she said.

The deal sounded too good to pass up, so she took it.

“Living with your parents is nice, but they get somewhat of a control over your life,” she said. “It’s nice being around my family again, but I can’t do some of the things I would like to do, like go over my boyfriend’s house late at night without telling them.”

South student Melyssa Ross says she moved back with her mom to help her out, and it has been a big transition from living on her own.

“At first, it sucked,” she said. “I’m used to being out late, and now I can’t bring friends over in the middle of the night and continue the party or club.”

She said her mom is always bugging her, but since it’s her house, she has to follow her rules.

“She lets me do what I want to do for the most part, but I still have to answer to somebody,” she said.

Ross said living with her mom is not all bad.

“I like having the extra money and not having to pay rent, electricity, water or cable. And my mom cooks!” she said.

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