The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Health issues concern blacks

Photo illustration by Sarah McVean
Photo illustration by Sarah McVean

By Alvis Allen/reporter

Photo illustration by Sarah McVean
Photo illustration by Sarah McVean

Heart disease, the No. 1 concern for the black community, killed about 136 out of every 100,000 blacks in 1998, far less than the 95 out of every 100,000 whites, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

Strokes are another concern for blacks. Strokes accounted for 42.5 deaths per 100,000 blacks versus 23.3 deaths per 100,000 from stroke among Caucasian adults.

According to an article in Black Health online, black men between 35 and 55 are four times more likely to die of a stroke.

The third-rated killer disease among blacks is cancer.

Black men are at least 50 percent more likely to develop lung cancer than white men.

Black men also die more often from cancer of the lung (100.8 per 100,000) than white men (70.1 per 100,000), according to an article in National Health Advisory.

The fourth-leading cause of death is diabetes, which is common in many households.

However, blacks have a rate of diabetes of 33.0 per 100,000 compared to a rate of 23.2 among whites.

Conjanika Findle, a freshman on NE Campus, was recently diagnosed with diabetes, and the diagnosis has changed her life.

“I am learning to cope with lifestyle changes, my eating habits and how I look at food,” she said.

Findle was never into exercising, but after seeing the effects diabetes had on her grandmother, it scared her.

“I’m ready to change my habits now,” she said.

The last of the top five deadly diseases is HIV-AIDS.

A decade ago, almost 10 times as many blacks (age 13 and older) had contracted AIDS (84.2 per 100,000) as whites in that age group.

The good news is that much of the spread of AIDS can be stopped by simple lifestyle decisions such as practicing safe sex and getting tested.

Other diseases that are not always fatal also affect the black community more than other ethnic groups.

Black men are twice as likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer as white men.

And although breast cancer is the most common type of cancer for women overall, the rate of breast cancer is slightly lower for black women than for white women.

Anyone can find ways to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle, Dr. Larry Burrows of the Fort Worth Orthopedic Clinic said.

“Diet and exercise alone can help improve chances of a long life,” he said.

Burrows said if people are diagnosed with any disease, they should consult with a doctor to determine changes in lifestyle.

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian