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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Movie Review-Son of Rambow

Will Proudfoot (Milner) dreams of adventurous escapades in Son of Rambow.  Photo courtesy Paramount Vantage
Will Proudfoot (Milner) dreams of adventurous escapades in Son of Rambow. Photo courtesy Paramount Vantage

By Sara Pintilie/entertainment editor

Son of Rambow (4.5 stars)

Will Proudfoot (Milner) dreams of adventurous escapades in Son of Rambow.  Photo courtesy Paramount Vantage
Will Proudfoot (Milner) dreams of adventurous escapades in Son of Rambow. Photo courtesy Paramount Vantage

Son of Rambow, a film celebrating friendships, imagination and the ’80s, is the most genuine and charming comedy of the spring.

Will (Bill Milner) lives a sheltered life. His religious sect doesn’t allow him to watch any TV or listen to music.

But after crossing paths with the school hooligan, Lee (Will Poulter), he gets roped into being Lee’s new movie stuntman.

At Lee’s residence, Will sees his first film—Rambo: First Blood.

Will’s imagination takes hold, and he creates an elaborate story with him as the Son of Rambow.

Rambow is trapped in a jail cell inside of a scarecrow guarded by flying dogs.

Lee agrees to make Will’s tale the subject of his movie, and the two are off doing crazy stunts, fastening plastic dogs to kites and becoming fast friends.

Meanwhile, a French exchange student, Didier (Jules Sitruk), is extremely bored with everything. 

But when his lackeys discover Will and Lee’s endeavors, he offers his immense talent, which turns out to be insanely bad acting, and ego to benefit their flick.

Son of Rambow is a refreshing buddy tale, extremely rewarding for the entire family.

The audience can tell the director, Garth Jennings, put a lot of effort and pride into this film.

Though the film is PG-13, mainly for a kid smoking and some language, there is nothing too risqué for the young ones.

The leads, Poulter and Milner, fit into their energetic and mesmerizing parts like combat gloves.

The audience is charmed by their whimsical ways and the film’s clever story.

The movie is set in the late ’80s in England, and the decade’s bizarre style adds to the comedy.

Son of Rambow is widely imaginative and endearing.

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