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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Movie Review-Blades of Glory

Jon Heder and Will Ferrell cut dashing figures as they compete for top honors in pair skating in Blades of Glory. Heder plays Jimmy McElroy and Ferrell plays Chazz Michaels in this spoof on the sport.  Photo courtesy Dreamworks
Jon Heder and Will Ferrell cut dashing figures as they compete for top honors in pair skating in Blades of Glory. Heder plays Jimmy McElroy and Ferrell plays Chazz Michaels in this spoof on the sport. Photo courtesy Dreamworks

By Isaiah Smith/entertainment editor

Jon Heder and Will Ferrell cut dashing figures as they compete for top honors in pair skating in Blades of Glory. Heder plays Jimmy McElroy and Ferrell plays Chazz Michaels in this spoof on the sport.  Photo courtesy Dreamworks
Jon Heder and Will Ferrell cut dashing figures as they compete for top honors in pair skating in Blades of Glory. Heder plays Jimmy McElroy and Ferrell plays Chazz Michaels in this spoof on the sport. Photo courtesy Dreamworks

Jon Heder and Will Ferrell kick some ice in Blades of Glory, a hilarious look at the world of professional male figure skating.

Banned from the sport for fighting, the rival skaters find a loophole stating they can still compete—as a duo.

Jimmy McElroy, played by Heder, is a child prodigy adopted by a millionaire-businessman; he’s trained his whole life to be the world’s greatest figure skater.

McElroy is a by-the-books kind of technical performer, and his performance in a peacock-themed body-suit in the first-few minutes of the film is priceless.

Chazz Michael Michaels, played by Ferrell, is male figure-skating’s outlaw.

He honed his skills in the underground figure-skating scene in Detroit’s sewers, mostly improvising on the ice and using pyrotechnics.

Michaels trash-talks a lot toward McElroy, eventually leading to their disqualification because of a fight.

McElroy’s gay stalker, Hector, is brilliantly played by Nick Swardson, who somehow pulls off being the creepy, murderous, stalker of a male figure skater.

Hector is the only one obsessive enough to actually figure out a way to bring McElroy back onto the ice. 

Craig T. Nelson plays the pair’s coach, who whips the pair into shape for the nationals.

I loved Nelson on Coach, and I like seeing him in a similar role again.

His amazingly serious view of figure-skating is hilarious and adds that comedic straight-man aspect to the training sequences.

Will Arnett and Amy Poehler portray the Van Waldenberg twins.

The fraternal twins scheme to take out the first same-sex skating duo in the history of the sport, hoping to stop them before the odd couple takes the gold medal from the top-ranking twins.

The twins add a funny dynamic as they guilt-trip their sister Katie into spying for them.

This movie reminds me a bit of Talladega Nights because it has the news-like lead-ins to the skating sequences as Nights used for the racing sequences.

I laughed all through this cool comedy.

The pained looks on Heder’s and Ferrell’s faces while they perform the up-close-and-personal pair-skating moves left me rolling with laughter.

Blades of Glory debuted at No. 1 on its opening weekend, which is no surprise because it is so funny. I love comedies like this that take a look at a weird sub-culture and portray it as insanely serious.

Another scene of note is a high-speed chase in ice skates that begins at full speed on the ice before stumbling and slipping its way through a convention center.

In the end, Blades of Glory is a typical situation comedy based around sports, but the male figure-skating angle is fresh and funny. I give this movie four stars.

Jon Heder and Will Ferrell in one comedy?

Sign me up!

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