The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

South student organization seeking global solutions

South student organization seeking global solutions

By Susan Tallant/editor-in-chief

swalogop1South Campus students are going global to tackle issues abroad and at home with a new chapter of the Student World Assembly.

SWA is a non-governmental, non-partisan organization created to represent students worldwide and help them deal with pressing concerns such as universal primary education, gender-based violence and access to healthcare.

John Haglund, geology instructor on South Campus, learned about the SWA while on a trip with TCC students in Salzburg.

“ I saw it as a great opportunity for students to get involved in global issues, so I started a chapter on South Campus,” he said.

Haglund said TCC students who get involved with the organization collaborate with other students around the world to discuss topics of importance and learn how to take action.

“ Students are blogging with others in Africa, Asia and Europe about issues,” he said. “These students really want to make a difference.”

Haglund said with so many problems in the world, it can get overwhelming to choose a subject, so the SWA picks one at a time to focus on. The current topic is human trafficking—slavery of (mostly) women and children for labor and sex.

Haglund said tens of thousands are trafficked to the U.S. and Eastern Europe each year, but since North Texas is a hot bed for the problem, the issue takes on a new meaning.

“ It’s an absolute outrage,” he said. “The more you read about it, the madder it makes you.”

Haglund said students in the SWA brainstorm with students from other colleges to come up with ways to apply pressure to politicians and take action.

Steven Emenhiser, South Campus student and treasurer of the chapter, said he joined to gain experience, converse with people abroad about universal issues and try to make a difference in the world.

“ It’s a way for students to communicate globally about issues that are constantly being ignored,” he said.

At first, Haglund was intimidated about starting the organization and thought, “What do I do?” But he said the SWA makes the process easy.

“ All you need is one instructor from each campus to be a facilitator. All the students need is a little guidance,” he said. “I encourage other campuses to start a chapter.”

Currently, the South Campus chapter has six members but is looking to grow its organization.

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