The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

CD Review-The Knux-Remind Me In 3 Days

By Alex Muhindura/entertainment editor

The Knux’s debut album Remind Me In 3 Days is the most eclectic mix of quality music put out in the past few years.

The fusion of Deep South funk, punk-rock’s “f-you” attitude and the intricate wordplay that embodies all the rap masterpieces make for a sonic gumbo that could only emerge from the Creole capital.

The Knux consists of brothers Kintrell “Krispy Kream” Evans and Alvin “Rah Al Millio” Evans. They are former, self-professed band nerds who, on top of writing the material, play all the instruments and produce the tracks.

From the opening track “The List,” they impose their will on listeners with a simple yet addictive bass line, subtle drumming and playful, easygoing lyrics that make listeners feel as if they are hanging out on the tour bus. Many of their songs are based on the lifestyle they encountered when they arrived in Hollywood to record their album.

“Once we got to L.A., there was just a whole different vibe,” Al Millio said on the Knux Web site. “We were going to all the downtown clubs with f*****g socialite girls and the so-called hipsters, and guys like Steve Aoki. It was a totally different scene than from what we were used to in New Orleans, and the music we started making reflected that.”

Their music defies convention yet manages to stay relevant and on point. The raw energy emanating from the speakers sounds like the love child of Outkast and The Clash. On the track “Bang Bang,” the guitar strokes sound like a call to action, and the crisp lyrics detail their harsh upbringing in New Orleans’ Third Ward without a hint of cliché or braggadocio. 

“I don’t want to sound like a hypocrite my momma raised me for greatness/but we broke as f***, hope is stuck and New Orleans defines the cages,” raps Al Millio on the first verse.

Another breakout single is “Cappuccino,” which deals with the quest for the perfect girl. The song begins with an eerie synthesizer sound that is accompanied by a raspy guitar, but it transforms into a bouncing cadence that resembles a soundtrack for new-age players. Seriously, this song would make the 40-Year-Old Virgin feel like Casanova.

The infectious, easygoing vibe makes this album perfect for jamming on the way to the nightclub as well as listening to on a lazy Sunday afternoon. It comes off as a genuine reflection of this duo’s life and interests even if that consists of socialites and Champagne.

Even the weaker songs in the middle of the CD sound better after a second listen although some of the beats begin to sound repetitive. The duo could also improve their guitar playing, as there is little chord progression.

The Knux represents one of the most impressive rap debuts since Lupe Fiasco’s Food and Liquor.

This album is a strong punch in the arm of hip-hop that has been badly needed. With much of the recent past’s best work emerging from the underground scene, this pair brings a spicy infusion into the bland, barren wasteland of commercial rap.

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