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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

South artist shows off shapes in exhibit

Untitled, Randy Guthmiller. Photos by Katelyn Townsend/The Collegian
Untitled, Randy Guthmiller. Photos by Katelyn Townsend/The Collegian
Untitled, Randy Guthmiller
Untitled, Randy Guthmiller

By Jamil Oakford/se news editor

Shapes are invading South Campus’ Carillon Gallery.

Randy Guthmiller, the artist whose work is on display, has put shapes at the heart of this collection of work.

As South’s artist-in-residence, Guthmiller made all of the artwork while on the campus.

“Josh [Goode, assistant professor of art] said to come on out, and everything was set up for me,” he said. “My time here was very fruitful.”

He had to choose between many pieces, and the art featured in the gallery is the best.

The body of work displayed is a collection of mono prints, something that Guthmiller is happy about.

“You can’t make it again. It’s a unique object,” he said.

Untitled, Randy Guthmiller. Photos by Katelyn Townsend/The Collegian
Untitled, Randy Guthmiller. Photos by Katelyn Townsend/The Collegian

Guthmiller, who also has murals featured in Bishop Arts and Deep Ellum in Dallas, chose to do his artwork featured on a smaller scale.

“I prefer things on the smaller side because it’s more intimate,” he said.

Students who attended the opening night reception Sept. 4 were eager to ask him questions about the exhibit.

“I’m intrigued to figure out what the shapes represented,” South painting student Jason Heslep said. “I’m trying to see if they’re telling a story.”

Most people were intrigued to know the materials he used and methods.

Using wood and Plexiglass as the stencil for every piece of art, Guthmiller would then transfer that over to paper as a print. 

His inspiration for the types of shapes used comes from everywhere.

“Some from life, images in magazines, my imagination, what happens if I cut this way,” he said. “Trusting my gut and saying this feels good.”

Students had a positive response to his artwork, many enjoying his choice of colors and the texture of the paper he used. He discussed with them his favorite paper to use for prints.

“The colors actually pop off the page. Subtle ones even draw you in as well,” South painting student Sean Morgan said.

Guthmiller also stressed that he tries “keeping the texture sensual” to encourage a viewer to want to touch the art.

His overall hope for visitors and viewers of his art is that they will take away “something deeper and appreciate subtle beauty in everyday life.”

Guthmiller’s artwork is on display in the gallery until Oct. 2.

“It’s nothing too heavy,” he said, referring to the exhibit. “Let’s talk about shapes. Let’s have great conversations.”

For appointments to see the exhibit in the Joe B. Rushing Performing Arts Center, contact Goode at 817-515-4641 or joshua.goode@tccd.edu.

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