The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

South uses poems, rap to remember Katrina

South uses poems, rap to remember Katrina

By Tee Townsend/ reporter

South’s Carillon Theatre creates a collage of emotions in the production of Katrina: 10 Years After, opening Oct. 1.

James Bonar runs his lines during a recent rehearsal.
James Bonar runs his lines during a recent rehearsal.

Though only one cast member is a Katrina survivor, James Bonar, the play tells a story of overcoming the “curveballs” that life throws, said director Lindy Benton.

“It’s about human resilience,” she said.

Benton said the outline of the play is based on research contributions from the cast members.

“Because we knew that the anniversary was coming up, the students all started doing research around that theme of not just what happened during Katrina but what has happened since,” she said. “They brought in all kinds of articles, poems, just a whole bunch of research for things they found interesting.”

Katrina: 10 Years After is about the life experiences of Katrina survivors during and after the hurricane. This original piece of art moves from the days of being in the floodwaters to rescue and survival.

“It’s like getting to see the pain of the victims and what they went through,” said South student and cast member D.J. Clark. “You get to understand what it’s like to be stuck on a roof.”

South Carillon Theatre presents Katrina: 10 Years After, an original play running Oct. 1-3. Photos by Bogdan Sierra Miranda/The Collegian
South Carillon Theatre presents Katrina: 10 Years After, an original play running Oct. 1-3.
Photos by Bogdan Sierra Miranda/The Collegian

Told from a survivor’s viewpoint, Katrina: 10 Years After is a collection of rap, poems and videos.

Though Katrina is a tragic event, South student and cast member Jimmy Linch said the play is about moving forward.

“It’s happy,” he said. “You have to be happy and not dwell on the past. Just like they do for funerals in Louisiana, they celebrate.”

South student and cast member Jasmine “Jazz” Ingram tells the story of “My Granny” in the play, which she describes as diverse.

Her role “brought back memories of her own grandmother,” she said. And the play “will reach all people young or old.”

Benton said she knows the audience and the student cast members will find the play relatable.

“Whether they know anything about Hurricane Katrina or not, I thought they could relate to the idea of going through tough times in life and coming out the other side with even more strength and hope and being able to move forward,” she said.

Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Oct. 1-3 in the Joe B. Rushing Center for Performing Arts. Tickets are $6 for general admission, $3 for non-TCC students and senior citizens and free for all TCC students, faculty and staff. Tickets can be purchased on the day of performance at the box office beginning at 7 p.m.

Performances begin promptly at 7:30 p.m. with no late seating.

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