The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

South students learn proper etiquette

By Gerrit McDonald/ reporter

First impressions are the most important, especially with an employer, said a certified etiquette consultant Oct. 6 on South Campus.

“It takes about five seconds to make a first impression and the first thing people notice is body language,” said former Winners in New Roles student Armie Snarley during a workshop to teach proper business etiquette.

Employers are always sizing up potential applicants, Snarley said. That’s why it’s always better to take a formal approach as opposed to a casual one, the same way that it’s always better to dress up than to dress down.

“Be sure to always mind your handshake because it is the only acceptable form of contact in the realm of business,” she said. “Your handshake will tell volumes about you. Don’t be a bone crusher, a finger-tip holder or a glove giver.”

Women shouldn’t wear rings or hand fragrances. Both of these can be annoyances to the person who is interviewing, Snarley said. Interviewees should stand for introductions and be sure to wear the nametag on the right side. It’s in the line of sight for the other person, and it helps when they forget a name.

“There are three tools when it comes to interacting with people, and all three involve eye contact,” she said. “There is the business eye signal, the social and the intimate. All three are dependent on the appropriate time, place and person.”

To give a savvy introduction, one should make it immediately, Snarley said, being sure to give the first and last name, including something about relevant work experience.

“Remember that ‘hi’ is never appropriate. Always say ‘hello’ and know the appropriate time to introduce yourself,” she said, “like when you recognize someone, when you are attending a gathering or when you are seated next to someone.”

The name of the person of greater authority is always said first, followed by the name of the lesser authority, Snarley said. The only exception is when dealing with clients as they always take precedent.

“Leave a handwritten goodbye note,” the etiquette consultant said. “It’s easy to send a text message or an email. That is why they are easily overlooked, but something tangible will always leave an impression.”

South student Dafna Ninio asked how to address women when their marriage status is unknown.

“Ms. is the correct honorific for a woman in the business arena,” Snarley said, “regardless of what she chooses to call herself in her private life.”

Ninio said she benefited from the workshop.

“I loved how engaging she [Snarley] was during the presentation,” she said. “It also meant a lot to me to see a former student who is now successful. It makes me feel like I am on the right path.”

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