The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Local women leaders move, make, motivate

By Hayden Priest/ reporter

Retiree Triesha Light is honored for her years as a TCC faculty member and advisor/coordinator of the Women in New Roles program. In recognition, the symposium committee renamed the event the Triesha Light Women’s Symposium.Photos by Bogdan Sierra Miranda/The Collegian
Retiree Triesha Light is honored for her years as a TCC faculty member and advisor/coordinator of the Women in New Roles program. In recognition, the symposium committee renamed the event the Triesha Light Women’s Symposium.
Photos by Bogdan Sierra Miranda/The Collegian

Students gathered Feb. 27 on South Campus for the 15th annual Women’s Symposium to hear from local community leaders. 

To kick off Women’s History Month, a panel of South students and Tarrant County community leaders discussed Becoming a Maker, Shaker and Mover.

Mayra Hernandez, president of the student organization LASSO, said her family had inspired her since she immigrated to the United States from Mexico.

“My parents have made a lot of sacrifices,” she said.

Although Hernandez struggled with getting used to a new culture and overcoming language barriers, she said her parents focused on her education and success.

“I came here with ‘hi, bye and how are you?’” she said.

Rashida Ivey, president of the South Rho Chi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, said she had a support system of professors, advisors and family who had guided her through her education. But now that she is older, she has to work without those who have supported her so far.

“One of my challenges has been moving away from my support system,” she said.

Tarrant County’s Democratic Party chair Deborah Peoples and Republican Party chair Jennifer Hall speak during the Feb. 27 Women’s Symposium on South about the qualities of leadership, overcoming adversity and achieving goals.
Tarrant County’s Democratic Party chair Deborah Peoples and Republican Party chair Jennifer Hall speak during the Feb. 27 Women’s Symposium on South about the qualities of leadership, overcoming adversity and achieving goals.

Ivey said her children have helped her to grow as a person and a woman.

Tarrant Democratic Party chair Deborah Peoples and county Republican Party chair Jennifer Hall spoke about leading their communities and families.

“A good leader also has to be willing to lead from behind,” Peoples said.

Peoples said she views her position as an opportunity to guide her community as well as the local Democratic Party.

Hall recalled the moment she decided to run for county chair.

“If I can fold this laundry, I can do anything,” she remembers telling herself.

Originally from Mississippi, LaDoris Pope, Tarrant County MHMR and Visions coordinator, attended Delta State in Cleveland, Mississippi, before moving to Texas. She became homeless but through the Visions program in Tarrant County attended TCC and took psychology classes. She has now almost completed her master’s in education psychology and intends to earn a doctorate.

“Remember to educate yourself in order to elevate yourself even if educating yourself means to learn more about yourself,” she advised the student audience.

A highlight of the symposium was recognizing recent TCC retiree Triesha Light, a South psychology associate professor and counselor for 46 years and adviser/coordinator of Women in New Roles for 38 years. The Women’s Symposium committee announced the symposium would be named the Triesha Light Women’s Symposium.

Mattie Peterson Compton, Tarrant County Bar Foundation Chair, spoke on the keys of being successful.

“You need to stop and sharpen your saw,” she said, speaking on the importance of reflection and growth.

Mattie Compton urges South Campus students to get out of their comfort zone and involved in their communities.
Mattie Compton urges South Campus students to get out of their comfort zone and involved in their communities.

Compton urged students to get out of their comfort zone, to banish the word “can’t” and remember that “No” is a complete sentence.

“Don’t put yourself in a box,” she said.

Compton said students should get connected to their community and peers.

Kathy Rollwage, a symposium vendor, has been involved with the event for many years as both a vendor and a coordinator.

“Vendors are selling their goods and services,” she said.

The vendors could network and reach out to people at the symposium. The vendors, some former TCC students, represented many fields, including insurance and sales.

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