The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Watson’s album uses new styles, speaks of life, love

Vaquero, Aaron Watson
Vaquero, Aaron Watson

By Hannah Lathen/ managing editor

Vaquero, Aaron Watson

If anyone needs a great album to ride around to on a Sunday afternoon, Aaron Watson has provided just that with his latest work Vaquero

Vaquero was released Feb. 24, just a little over two years since his last album The Underdog, which landed him on the Billboard Top Country Albums Chart. Watson was the first independent male country artist to do that.

Vaquero is a classic Watson album, but it does feature a few new twists to his style. He prides himself on being an independent artist and “keeping the cowboy in country music.” Like most country artists, Watson writes songs for the common man, but he tries to stay away from the pop-country currently playing on the radio, and this album keeps up with that.

Starting off, Watson reminds fans of his story writing abilities in “Texas Lullaby,” which tells the story of a man’s life starting from the age of 18 to when he died. It is a pretty classic narrative in country music.

As the title suggests, the album has a Spanish feel that can be heard on songs like the title track “Vaquero,” which talks about an old Hispanic cowboy talking about his life to folk-like music.

Watson made sure to include love on this album. On songs like “Be My Girl,” “Rolling Stone” and “Take You Home Tonight,” fans hear inspiration from Watson’s relationship with his wife.

“Outta Style” was the first single released off of Vaquero, and it is perfect for a dance hall. It is very upbeat and worth blasting loudly down the highway.

Following “Outta Style” is “Run Wild Horses,” and it is the most different song on the album. It sounds like a mixture of ’80s pop and ’70s disco mixed with country. It’s almost as if the Bee Gees performed in a honky-tonk, but it somehow just made sense.

A down-home feeling is heard on “Big Love in a Small Town.” This is the song one would play when driving through an old downtown square. “It’s a mom and pop, corner shop, five-and-dimer” is one of the many lines that paints a picture in listeners’ minds of growing up and falling in love in a small town.

The songs that will most likely receive attention are “Mariano’s Dream” and “Clear Isabel.” These tell the story of a man living in Mexico who loses his son to the cartel and moves with his daughter to Texas for a better life. Unsure if Watson planned this, but the song is very timely with immigration being a hot topic in the U.S. right now.

Watson really delivers with Vaquero. He is consistent with his common themes like loving, living life and telling stories about normal people but has added some unique, refreshing songs just good to hear.

This is one of the best albums in country to come out in a while, and it is more heartening coming from a musician doing it on his own, his own way.

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