The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Viewpoint – Braces provide more than cosmetic benefits

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By Richard Marmolejo/campus editor

Those discontent with their physical appearance may be influenced to try different methods to change their looks.

A well-known procedure is the magic of dental braces.

People with braces are regularly accused of getting them solely for cosmetic reasons. However, what people fail to realize is that the benefit of braces goes beyond just aesthetics.

It’s like they forget that braces are intended to treat real medical issues.

As a member of the brace face community, I can attest to how these stainless steel “bite fixers,” as some might refer to them, prevent future dental problems and conditions.

Straight teeth help a person bite, chew and even speak more effectively. But again, these problems can go beyond the surface appearance.

They reduce the incidence of tooth decay and gum disease, stop bone erosion and correct jaw disorders.

Braces position and align teeth by consistently exerting pressure to move them. The average 23-month treatment time for braces can take more or less time depending on the circumstances.

Malocclusion, or a “bad bite,” may lead to problems with the temporomandibular joint and cause digestion problems. In extreme cases, chronic headaches and back or neck pain can occur.

According to CostHelper.com, the average cost of braces in the U.S. is $4,937 without dental insurance and $3,407 with insurance.

Dental preparation is often needed, such as a deep cleaning or filling replacement, prior to treatment to ensure teeth are healthy and ready to take on the challenge of braces.

Studies show that an attractive smile boosts self-esteem, which is important at any age.

Mark Ackerman, the director of orthodontics at Boston Children’s Hospital, wrote about his view on braces.

“An imperfect bite cannot actually determine whether a person needs braces,” Ackerman wrote. “Instead, it’s the symptoms, or what results from that imperfect bite, that ultimately plays the deciding factor.”

At the end of the day, who really cares what others do with their lives? If you want braces, get them. If you don’t, that’s OK too.

People should quit worrying about others’ problems and work to fix their own.

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