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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Comedy show doubles as powerful recovery story

Photos+courtesy+Netflix.+BoJack+Horseman%2C+portrayed+by+Will+Arnett%2C+on+the+set+of+his+show+%E2%80%9CPhilbert%E2%80%9D+alongside+co-star+Gina+Cazador%2C+voiced+by+Stephanie+Beatriz.
Photos courtesy Netflix. BoJack Horseman, portrayed by Will Arnett, on the set of his show “Philbert” alongside co-star Gina Cazador, voiced by Stephanie Beatriz.
November 13, 2019 | Juan Ibarra | editor-in-chief
Photos courtesy Netflix. BoJack Horseman, portrayed by Will Arnett, on the set of his show “Philbert” alongside co-star Gina Cazador, voiced by Stephanie Beatriz.
Photos courtesy Netflix. BoJack Horseman, portrayed by Will Arnett, on the set of his show “Philbert” alongside co-star Gina Cazador, voiced by Stephanie Beatriz.

A cartoon about a bipedal horse actor who lives in Hollywood sounds like the backdrop to a zany comedy, but it is the setting for one of entertainment’s most relatable and honest shows with commentary about addiction, depression and self-improvement.

Coming into the first half of its final season (the second half is set to release Jan. 31), “BoJack Horseman” has a lot to live up to. The past five seasons have followed the titular character on his journey from a depressed, toxic narcissist to finally seek help in a rehab center after the dark events of season five.

Luckily, season six does not shy away from maturely talking about serious topics, and the comedy is as witty as ever.

Although season six sees BoJack getting help, the journey to recovery is not easy. From the difficulty of accepting help to taking a deeper look into the root of one’s issues, “BoJack Horseman” presents the information with nuance and maturity.

The season-long arc of self-improvement is a nice change of pace from the previous downward spiral of the five seasons that came before, and this provides a nice sense of levity to the usual foreboding themes.

BoJack is an addict who is struggling but trying to improve in every way. There is a sense of satisfaction that comes from watching this once-toxic character strive to make changes in his life. It feels like watching an old friend get better from afar.

Although the name of the show is “BoJack Horseman,” there are side characters that share equally as relatable storylines as BoJack.

Relationship issues, managing a career with a newborn baby and accepting help for depression are just a handful of the themes handled this season through the eyes of these characters.

Each plotline is given the respect to be handled in terrific and clever ways that could only be possible in an animated show.

The first half of season six continues the series’ high standard of quality while introducing new elements of a healthy lifestyle to the program. This season is the culmination of every action BoJack has made throughout the series and the second half can’t get here soon enough.

Bojack Horseman speaks about the difficulties he had with his mother to attempt to bring closure during her funeral in season five.
Bojack Horseman speaks about the difficulties he had with his mother to attempt to bring closure during her funeral in season five.
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