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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Disney+ Review-MCU’s new show is classic with a twist

MADDY REMINGTON
campus editor

Photo courtesy of Disney
Wanda Maximoff and Vision watch in amazement as their surroundings turn from black and white to color. The scene showcases the changing of the decades in the episodes.

Wandavision, the first show of Marvel’s fourth phase, is a modern spin on classic television that takes viewers through the decades, but with a creepy twist.

The show mimics old American TV shows by including canned laughter and cheesy lines. However, Wandavision is quite different from other shows and films from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It utilizes weird storylines and humorous dialogue. However, it stays in character with the rest of the MCU by having an underlying tone that something is going wrong. Cue creepy storyline.

The series takes viewers on a wild ride with Wanda Maximoff and Vision settling down in a friendly suburb. They are trying to project an image that they are a normal American couple to keep the secret of their powers safe.

The first episode introduces the idea that the characters don’t exactly know anything about their history or how they got to where they are. The next two episodes build on that idea with a theme similar to that of “The Truman Show.”

The first episode seems to take place in the fifties, while the second episode takes place in the sixties. At the end of the second episode, we see the world turn to color from black and white, and here enters the seventies-themed episode.

 

Photo courtesy of Disney
Wanda, played by Elizabeth Olsen, notices something isn’t right when a colored helicopter
falls from the sky in their black-and-white world.

The characters reference major themes of the decades with noticeable digs at the prevalence of sexism in the time periods.
Overall, the sitcom seems to be a mix of the dialogue and humor of “I Love Lucy” with the style and themes of “The Truman Show.”

Wanda and Vision both get a lot more character development in the show right away. We see more of the relationship between the pair and their dynamic is compelling. The audience also gets to see Wanda’s powers as the Scarlet Witch expanded upon, which is prevalent in all facets of her life.

Before watching this show, it was difficult to understand her powers’ purpose and her full capabilities, but after viewing, the viewer understands how she fits into the greater MCU.
Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bethany are the perfect pair to play Wanda and Vision because of their chemistry and impeccable acting skills. They shift into different versions of their characters in each era, and their acting throughout the funny and even the serious scenes just screams talent.

Wandavision was not at all what I expected, but I’ve found that’s what makes it perfect. The viewer finds themselves asking, “What is going on?” several times throughout each episode, but it’s not enough of a confusing storyline to turn the viewer off the show.

The cinematography is enticing and fits the style of the decade of the episode. The editing is precise and the scenes where the pair displays their powers are cut effortlessly into the timeline.

The first three episodes have been released on Disney+, with the next six coming out weekly on Fridays.

While this show is quite different from much of the typical MCU content, that aspect makes it all the more appealing and compelling to watch. Dedicated Marvel fans and anyone who just wants a good laugh should definitely watch Wandavision.

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