The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

“Prom Pact,” Disney’s successful attempt at a romantic comedy

Peyton Elizabeth Lee and Milo Manheim star as main characters Mandy Yang and Ben Pluckett in “Prom Pact” which premiered March 31 on Disney+. Photo courtesy of Disney+
Peyton Elizabeth Lee and Milo Manheim star as main characters Mandy Yang and
Ben Pluckett in “Prom Pact” which premiered March 31 on Disney+.
Photo courtesy of Disney+

NINA BANKS
campus editor
nina.banks@my.tccd.edu

Disney+ made a romantic comedy, and it wasn’t half bad. It doesn’t meet the legendary status of other rom coms on the streaming platform but the “Prom Pact” certainly gave its all.

Released on Mar. 31, “Prom Pact” follows Mandy Yang, an ambitious high school senior who was waitlisted to Harvard and is willing to do absolutely anything to get accepted. In her case, this means tutoring the school’s golden boy Graham Lansing to get a letter of recommendation from his father, a Harvard alum senator. But along the way, Mandy develops feelings for Graham and begins to debate whether Harvard is worth risking her relationships for.

The movie takes heavy inspiration from the 80s. The whole movie leads up to the 80s themed prom. Throughout the film are references to 80s movies. Including a promposal based on the iconic Tom Cruise dance from the movie “Risky Business.”

In typical rom com fashion, Mandy is the exact opposite of Graham. She shares similarities with Kat Stratford, the outspoken feminist protagonist of “10 Things I Hate About You.” She lacks school spirit and believes school dances are severely outdated. Graham on the other hand is the most popular boy in school. Athletic and unafraid to indulge in the stereotypical pleasures of high school.

Do not be fooled by the fact that this is a high school movie by Disney. The film features scenes of high school parties with the infamous red Solo cup and even a crude sex joke. The language or content isn’t wildly explicit. However to a viewer like me who expected an operating table clean movie, this may come as a surprise.

The movie’s plot was predictable, but enjoyable nonetheless. What was not predictable, however, was the relationship between Mandy and her best friend Ben Plunkett. In most rom coms, Mandy and Ben would’ve ended up together after one of them realizes that they are hopelessly in love with the other. But in the “Prom Pact,” this is not the case.

The platonic chemistry between Mandy and Ben is refreshing. They have a ritual every Friday night involving bookstores, movies and ending the night by sharing a plate of waffles. There is no question that there is love between the two, but it remains strictly platonic with no inkling of possible romance. Who would have thought that genuine male-female friendships were one of the things we were lacking in representation?

Inevitably, Mandy tarnishes her friendship with Ben after prioritizing Graham, but she apologizes and makes up for it in the way they know how — waffles.

The actors do a phenomenal job in their roles and help the delivery of the script. Milo Manheim, who plays Ben, delivers his role in such an endearing way that even his awkward bits come off as charming. 

If cheesy rom coms, prom and indecision about waffles are your forte, I highly recommend the “Prom Pact.” Don’t let the Mickey ears deter you from a good time.

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian