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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Yet another FBI show: ‘The Night Agent’ // An investigation of mystery, deception in the trusted White House

The White House’s integrity is questioned when a mole disrupts and sabotages the safety of thousands of civilians. Photo courtesy Netflix
The White House’s integrity is questioned when a mole disrupts and sabotages the safety of thousands of civilians.
Photo courtesy Netflix

OLLA MOKHTAR
campus editor
olla.mokhtar@my.tccd.edu

The FBI and the Secret Service have made yet another appearance in the Top 10 shows on Netflix; The Night Agent. 

Deriving from the book by Matthew Quirk under the same title, scheming, murder, scandal and a dash of romance is all what this show had to offer starting March 23, however it isn’t all that different from popular shows like “NCIS”, “CSI” and “Bones”. Starring FBI agent Peter Sutherland, his sole job is to answer a phone in the basement of the White House that supposedly never rings as a part of Night Action, a top-secret investigative program within the FBI.

That is until Rose Larkin calls in the midst of running away from her uncle and aunt’s killers in an intrusion. Before they pass away they tell their niece and only survivor of the attack, Rose Larkin, to call a special number that directs her directly to said FBI agent – Sutherland. Her aunt and 

Throughout the 10 part series, Sutherland is tasked to protect her as the relentless killers try and alter her fate to match her aunt and uncle’s. Unveiling why two federal agents were killed makes them question everything they know about those in power, loyalty and trust.

Sutherland and Larkin present as yin and yang. Sutherland being the one who loyally answers to authority without question and Larking being the one who’s more independent. This dynamic was executed flawlessly, amid the frustrating search for the truth behind her relatives’ death, they each struggled with continuing on on their search or giving the ‘proper’ authorities the chance to solve it on their own. 

It gave viewers a chance to reflect on their own ideologies on trust, something that was unexpected but thought provoking as well. 

Even though the time between the agents’ deaths and solving the mystery was only a few days, they developed a sense of innate trust, a seemingly unbreakable bond that slowly turns romantic. Now that is what is particularly interesting, because it could be so many things including trauma-bonding and blind faith. 

Maybe even kindred spirits. 

The director did a phenomenal job with creating a philosophical turn in an action series beautifully. 

What was even more beautiful was the plot however, unlike the main characters’ chemistry it was unoriginal . The fact that two ‘low-levels’ are trying to figure out who in the White House is responsible for Larkin’s aunt and uncle’s death is seen in many hit shows “NCIS”, “Criminal Minds” and so many other government intelligence agency shows in the past two decades. 

Underdog vs. authority has been overdone so many times.

Don’t get me wrong, watching two people bond through trust and romance makes me giddy but because it was only 10 episodes long, the action and major events happened quickly and soon were cause for a headache . The director could have stretched it out for at least 20 episodes, with an attractive female and male lead and more originality it could’ve been better. But it became exhausting to follow their journey because everything was just like lightning speed. 

Intriguing to look at but too fast to follow or understand.

Spice and an element of genuine surprise is nice to have, but there is something much more satisfying to watch in a longer, more thought out plot. If you like subtle romance and FBI fights against the ‘evil’ authority, you should watch this. 

And every other BookTok recommendation solely on the fact that the main character looks like a fictional character in a romantic novel.

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