The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Despite split ends, education rules all

A young boy wants to donate his hair to charity.

Taylor Pugh, a 4-year-old attending Mesquite ISD, is growing his hair long so he can donate it to a charity that makes wigs for people with cancer. The school is fighting Taylor’s parents because his hair has grown over his ears and his collar — a violation of school rules.

Taylor was suspended from school. When he returned, his parents still had not cut his hair. The school removed Taylor from his class and placed him in the library with a tutor. Since he still had not cut his hair, the district was considering in-school suspension.

Taylor’s parents were planning on pulling him from the school, but when his mom put his hair in two French braids, he was allowed to return to class. This was his idea. He wanted to be with his classmates.

What started as a noble cause for a young boy turned into a fight between the school and the parents. The family is planning an appeal to the state commissioner of education. A petition drive and a march in Austin are also being discussed to make sure the family gets a hearing.

Enough is enough. Why should Taylor get special attention and the other children still have to abide by the rules?

Children need the structure of rules so they can grow up to be responsible adults. Children also need to be around their peers. They learn to interact and communicate better when they are around other children.

Right now, it looks like it is turning into the parents’ fight. They should comply with the school rules and enforce what those rules are trying to teach. The parents do not have to agree with the school but can still show their child’s education is important and rules should be followed. Publicity is great, and sometimes when we get it, we lose sight of what should be most important, which is Taylor’s education. It is, after all, just hair.

We all want the best for our children. Sometimes that means making them do something they do not want to do, but it always is in the best interest of the child.

Education should be put ahead of every issue — even growing your hair for charity.

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian