The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Number of flu cases increases among students

By Elyssa Whaley/ne news editor

With flu cases running rampant both locally and nationally, TCC campuses are offering flu shots for $12.

Vouchers need to be purchased in business services and the receipt taken to health services to claim a flu vaccination. NE Campus has sold out its share of shots, but all other campuses still have vouchers and flu shots available.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the numbers of flu cases are up this season, and pregnant women, babies and senior citizens aren’t the only ones at risk. Individuals with asthma, heart disease, diabetes or a body mass index over 40 are at risk as well.

“Other than the obvious, people should make sure they are getting plenty of rest and eating well,” said Pat Marling, registered nurse and coordinator of health services on NE Campus.

Marling said she finds many Americans skip meals and do not get proper nutrition.

“Eat more fruits and vegetables to get more antioxidants in your body to boost your immune system,” she said.

To avoid this highly contagious virus, the CDC suggests people should wash their hands regularly or use an alcohol-based sanitizer when soap and water are not available. Also people should cover their nose and mouth with a tissue when sneezing and do not touch their face.

The CDC recommends staying home for 24 hours after a fever is gone without the use of fever-reducing medications.

“These medications only reduce these symptoms but do not get rid of the virus,” Marling said. “When the medication subsides four to six hours later, if your fever is still there, you’re still sick and still contagious.”

Dr. Woody Kageler, director of the allied health department on TR, said the flu consists of fever, muscle aches, cough, headaches and nasal congestion.

Kare Pachaco, a TCC student, picked up the virus this season and said she has idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in which the autoimmune system destroys blood platelets.  She said she noticed something was up when she had muscle aches, went to work and was sent home.

“I went anyways,” Pachaco said. “I’m a temp. If I miss work, I don’t get paid.”

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