The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Organizations can help prepare for future

South+Campus+club+presidents+provide+information+to+new+and+current+students+about+their+organizations+at+a+recruiting+event+in+the+cafeteria.+%0D%0AGeorgia+Phillips%2FThe+Collegian
South Campus club presidents provide information to new and current students about their organizations at a recruiting event in the cafeteria. Georgia Phillips/The Collegian

By Chan Mon/reporter

South Campus club presidents provide information to new and current students about their organizations at a recruiting event in the cafeteria.
Georgia Phillips/The Collegian

Membership in clubs or organizations not only gives students chances to have fun but also helps with studying and preparing for a career field after graduation.

Students gain many benefits from joining clubs, said Amity Womelsdorff, NE Campus student development associate.

“Many students move away from home, and they don’t have a strong support group,” she said. “There is something fun for them to do, and they can receive support from each other in the club.”

Womelsdorff said students can join a curriculum-based club, organizations that relate to their field or a hobby club where people get together to discuss various topics, such as anime or politics.

“Another advantage is you can apply for a transfer scholarship with your high GPA and join one of the honor societies,” she said. “Taking a leadership role in any organization is good when you are applying for a scholarship.”

Jasmine Tuya, South Campus student activities senior office assistant, emphasized the academic side of clubs.

“The goal for the club is to help improve GPAs,” she said, “and most students in the club are studying the same classes, so they can help each other.”

Some organizations can be an investment, Tuya said.

“You pay a $95 fee for Phi Theta Kappa, but you get thousands of dollars in scholarship grants when you transfer,” she said.

TCC provides almost 100 student clubs or organizations, and each campus has its own share. Most are degree, hobby, culture or community-based.

“Joining a club is not only part of academic and career life,” said Amy Staley, SE student development associate. “You will feel that you belong to the campus and you are part of the community.”

Most campuses host club fairs during the first three weeks of the fall and spring semesters. NE and South campuses had fairs earlier this month. Other fairs are scheduled for Jan. 23-24 on NW, Jan. 30-31 on SE and Jan. 31 on TR’s Main Street.

“Recruiting more members makes the club more active, and more people will be interested in it,” said J.J. Shofner, vice president of the Gamers United Club on TR Campus. “Currently, we have about 120 members, and we have club meetings a couple of times a week. Gamers United club is very active and has at least one tournament a month.”

Students can join any club at any time and can learn about clubs and organizations at the student activities office on any campus.

Students can join a club to meet people who are studying in the same field, and new students can find out what is available on the campus for them, said Vesta Martinez, NW student development services director.

“However, if a student is particularly interested in a group, and we don’t have that area, we encourage them to start a new one,” Martinez said. “By doing so, they will gain leadership skills and time management skills.”

Campuses generally add a few clubs each year. The basic requirements are at least five members and an adviser who is a full-time faculty member.

A group of SE students recently started a new club to help students use software applications.

“They plan to bring someone who knows about an application from outside into the school to students who want to learn how to use it,” Staley said.

Martinez said the number of clubs on her campus increased last fall while some clubs became inactive. One reason clubs become inactive, she said, is because club members transfer.

Eddie Brassart, TR student development associate, said it is important that club presidents give back the club’s password and documents when stepping down to help the club continue.

“To keep the club in existence, the president of the club should train and recruit its members to succeed even after transfer,” Brassart said. “They need to manage time for classes, club and family issues.”

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian