The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Board allows statue, approves construction

By Karen Gavis/editor-in-chief

TCC is now visualizing a performing arts center, renovated science labs, multimillion-dollar copy services and a statue as a result of the April 18 board meeting.

In an update on the state Legislature, Chancellor Erma Johnson Hadley said the state has decided to provide 50 percent of the college’s cost for employee retirement and health benefits.

After approval by the board and at no cost to the college, the TCC Foundation will explore the feasibility of raising funds for a performing arts center on NE Campus with hopes that the community will support the new facility philanthropically.

South Campus was on the board’s agenda several times and received approval for the opening of a 2014 charter school as well as a $4 million-plus renovation for its science labs. 

Vice chancellor of finance Mark McClendon said the science building on South is one of its original 1960s buildings, and a board memo stated the renovation will address, among other things, code, ventilation and equipment issues.

Board member O.K. Carter was the only opposing vote on several issues including a move to approve more than $10 million for a six-year copy services contract awarded to Denitech. Carter questioned why the contractor who met specifications and provided the lowest bid had not received the contract to provide print management and mail services.

McClendon explained how a committee had selected Denitech as the service provider based on a point-system criteria.

Although TCC will retain ownership of the property, the board voted unanimously to allow a 12-foot bronze statue of Ripley Arnold, created by Missouri artist Archie St. Clair, to be erected on TR Campus between Taylor Street and the river.

According to the Texas State Historical Association, Arnold established Camp Worth, later named Fort Worth, near the Trinity in 1849.

“The plaza is designed to accommodate a classroom. There will be granite benches around the peripheral,” said James Toal with the Tarrant Regional Water District. “It just so happens you own the land right there.”

Toal said Texas red granite, like that in the county’s courthouse, will be used in the surrounding John V. McMillan Plaza.

A ground blessing is scheduled for June 6.

“We think this will add value,” Hadley said.

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