The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Options for owners keep animals safe

Recently at an express service center of an Irving dealership, I was forced to slam on my brakes as a Calico kitten ran in front of my car and into the nearby bushes. When I called for the poor thing, it was nowhere to be found.

This infuriated me.

How could this defenseless and beautiful creature have found its way into such an industrial area? With so many cars on the busy access roads, the area is no place for an animal.

I have two loves in my life: Abba and animals. Though the musical stylings of the Swedish pop wonders will live on forever, the animals many dump on the side of roads will not. The majority of the animals become victim to reality Frogger, and it is, believe it or not, avoidable.

Owners have options if they cannot afford or take care of their pets any longer.

Using the Internet as an owner search engine is great. Social media has become something more than just a way to creep. Ask friends and acquaintances if they know of anyone who would like a parakeet via Twitter or Facebook. Petfinder.com helps people search for distinct breeds in surrounding areas, and Craigslist is useful as well. The pet pages for each city are filled with adoptable pets. Because the animals have to be picked up by those who want them, it gives one a chance to see the potential family a puppy could live with and determine if that person is a suitable owner.

The most popular choice is not always the best. Many give animals to pounds, humane societies and pet shelters. The upside to this choice is these groups do their own screening of potential owners and call for follow-ups on the adopted pets. The downside is every shelter has limited space. The cages are small, and many animals are euthanized before they have a chance to be adopted.

If friends are not available, the best option is to try and find a no-kill shelter, which can also be the most difficult. The animals must qualify to be accepted into the shelter and, even then, be put on waiting lists to enter.

The decision can be hard, but anything is better than animals near cars and trucks barreling down freeways at 70 mph.

To find a shelter in the nearest area and learn how to volunteer, go to petfinder.com.

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