The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

NW faculty art featured in gallery

By Joshua Knopp/entertainment editor

The NW Campus art department hosted a reception Sept. 11 in the Lakeview Gallery for its faculty exhibit.The display that runs through Oct. 2 is a long-running tradition for the campus spanning back to its inception in 1976.Professor Eduardo Aguilar has seen the progression of the annual exhibit from the time when he was the only full-time faculty member. This year’s show features the work of 20 faculty members, the most in the event’s history.

The presentations showed the thought process behind art as well as the diversity of art.

“If you actively try to pursue ideas, they are very elusive,” instructor Malone Samuels said. “I do what we tell our students to do — try to keep an active sketchbook … work generates work.”

This is exemplified in Alvaro Perez’s piece, a collection of four prototype chess pieces. Perez had worked in a metal shop and would play chess with his co-workers in his downtime. After all but he and one other employee were laid off, and downtime on his shift increased dramatically because of the recent economic crisis, Perez began to use the time to design his own chess set. He is currently working on a new set derived from the knight that is on display.

Inspiration can come from anywhere. Instructor John Spriggins drew his from an interest in the modern woman’s self-image inspired by his young daughter. 

Spriggins’ piece, “Could Your Man Be Gay?” is the silhouette of a woman formed from cutout fashion magazine covers. The woman’s identity is obscured in a sea of instructions on how to stay thin or keep a man.

Another instructor, Stephen Battle, drew inspiration for his piece from the oil disaster in the gulf.

“I thought it was incredibly beautiful, the way the oil was mixing with the water. Aside from, you know, the destruction,” he said.

Another instructor who draws inspiration from destruction is associate professor John Hartley. His piece, “Blue Indian Chief,” is a rendering of an extreme close-up of a toy Indian chief. With his piece, Hartley asks why Native Americans are belittled so often and so subtly.

“Why is it OK for a football team to be named after a race of people?” Hartley asks.

Seeing their teacher’s work is inspiring to the students. Many of Battle’s art appreciation students were assigned to write on art in the gallery and said they were in awe of the talent they went to school with every day.

“I really like a lot of it just because it’s different. It makes you more interested in taking their classes,” said Steffani Lopez, a student in Battle’s class.

Lopez’s classmate Brandon Harris added, “It’s quite amazing.”

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