The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Classes held, despite shooting threat on NE

Sam Sensa, NE Campus student, picks up his belongings after passing through a metal detector in the NE Campus library where a shooting threat was found last week. Watching the proceedings is Cpl. John Roundy of the campus police. Classes were held Saturday although the threat designated the shooting would occur then.  Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian
Sam Sensa, NE Campus student, picks up his belongings after passing through a metal detector in the NE Campus library where a shooting threat was found last week. Watching the proceedings is Cpl. John Roundy of the campus police. Classes were held Saturday although the threat designated the shooting would occur then. Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian

By Mark Bauer/editor-in-chief

Sam Sensa, NE Campus student, picks up his belongings after passing through a metal detector in the NE Campus library where a shooting threat was found last week. Watching the proceedings is Cpl. John Roundy of the campus police. Classes were held Saturday although the threat designated the shooting would occur then.  Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian
Sam Sensa, NE Campus student, picks up his belongings after passing through a metal detector in the NE Campus library where a shooting threat was found last week. Watching the proceedings is Cpl. John Roundy of the campus police. Classes were held Saturday although the threat designated the shooting would occur then. Photo by Sarah McVean/The Collegian

Classes remained in session on NE Campus last Saturday despite a shooting threat found scribbled on a bathroom stall a couple of weeks ago, but judging by the lack of cars in the parking lot-, it was difficult to tell.

Per recommendation by Dr. Larry Darlage, NE Campus president, students were given the option to stay home, and stay home they did.

Sgt. Tony Woolum of NE Campus said he would be surprised if there were even 250-300 cars on campus during peak hours.

Mark Penland, instructional associate in photography on NE Campus, said at one point there were three students in his building during a time bracket in which two classes were scheduled.

While it could not be determined if the low turnout was directly related to the threat, the change in atmosphere was definitely felt.

“The turnout was so light, I had students asking if the campus was open. It was much lighter than usual,” Penland said.

At one point, Penland recalled feeling as if there was a two-to-one ratio of police to students.

Frank Buchanan, TCC police chief, said security measures were increased across the district, with emphasis on NE Campus. All patrols, he said, at least doubled.

Local municipal police departments were also notified in case a situation arose.

Buchanan was on campus Saturday and said the atmosphere was calm. He was told on more than one occasion by students that the increased police presence was appreciated.

Last week, temporary metal detectors were installed in the NE library where the threat was discovered by a student.

“A lot [of students] were relieved, even if it might have slowed them down a tad,” Buchanan said.

He said current security levels will remain until the threat is adequately dispelled.

Campus police are continuing to ask any students with information related to the threat to come forward.

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