The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Superstitions run amok while Halloween draws near, beware

Halloween has quickly approached, which means scary movies, haunted houses and superstitions running rampant.

Superstition is defined as a belief that one event causes another without any natural process linking them.

Many athletes, actors, singers and others believe in superstitious routines before they play or perform.

SE student Dawinna Gurske said she doesn’t have any superstitions, but she’s heard a few crazy ones.

“I’ve heard that if your feet are brushed over with a broom, you won’t get married, or if you set your purse on the ground, you’ll always be broke,” she said.

SE student Ngan Dinh said she is superstitious.

“I’m superstitious about the year I was born in, and anytime I want to change what I’m doing, I’ll go look up what it says about people born in my year,” she said.

Dinh’s also heard some crazy superstitions.

“New Year’s Eve, people from the same family can’t leave the house after midnight,” she said. “If you let a family member into your house after midnight, it’ll bring bad luck to the house for the whole year.”

South student Chase Buchan says he doesn’t believe in superstition but believes in karma.

“I would say that if you do a good thing, a good thing will come to you in return,” he said. “If you help someone out, they may help you out when you need it most.”

Buchan said he doesn’t necessarily believe in ghosts and lore but enjoys the entertainment of it, especially haunted houses.

South student Taylor Potts said she doesn’t believe in superstition either but believes in constant routine to be prepared and in the right mindset.

— Ashley Wood

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