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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Veasey emphasizes education

U.S.+Rep.+Marc+Veasey+stops+by+South+Campus+Feb.+21+to+talk+with+students+about+the+importance+of+education.Bogdan+Sierra+Miranda%2FThe+Collegian
U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey stops by South Campus Feb. 21 to talk with students about the importance of education.

Bogdan Sierra Miranda/The Collegian

By Tommie Owen/ reporter

U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey stops by South Campus Feb. 21 to talk with students about the importance of education.Bogdan Sierra Miranda/The Collegian
U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey stops by South Campus Feb. 21 to talk with students about the importance of education.
Bogdan Sierra Miranda/The Collegian

Black history awareness and the importance of education were among the topics discussed on South Campus by U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey of Fort Worth during early voting Feb. 21.

The event was sponsored by student activities to prepare TCC students for involvement in a four-year college.

“Students who choose to hear a congressman speak instead of eating lunch or going home after class are the students we target,” student development specialist Martin Molina said.

Veasey related a story of his great aunt’s 1938 commencement announcement inviting all to attend Henderson Negro High School. He said the norm was white, and anything involving blacks had to be labeled. The invitations for other graduates didn’t say Henderson White High School. He said that’s why Black History Month is needed.

“Integration brings the country together, and awareness is needed so that everyone has equal footing,” he said.

He then quoted the late TCC Chancellor Erma Johnson Hadley: “Every kid has the ability to do well in education if the right road is taken.” Veasey reminded the audience that she was TCC’s first black chancellor.

Veasey took the right road but still struggled to bridge the gap between cultures while attending Arlington Heights High School but never allowed that to keep him from receiving a good education.

“Here in the United States, everyone can get an education,” he said. “Even if you’re not that good, you still have the same opportunities.”

The more education people get the more successful they will be, Veasey said. Educated minority men are more likely to be at home with their families, and a two-income household creates a better standard of living, he said.

“Less baby daddies and more fathers,” South Campus student Juan Silva said.

Veasey encouraged students to take advantage of the time they have before a career or family takes over and becomes their main focus.

“The college student’s voice is powerful,” he said.

Veasey closed by telling students to be passionate toward whatever career they choose and make sure they enjoy whatever road they take.

“You’ve got to follow your heart but most important, get your education,” he said.

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