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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Movie Review: Traveling mishap makes chilling thriller

Photo courtesy of Netflix
Photo courtesy of Netflix

Michael Foster-Sanders
senior producer

There are not too many movies like “Beckett.” Sure, there are films that are mash-ups of different genres, but rest assured that “Beckett” is in a league of its own. 

Director Ferdinando Cito Filomarino crafts a tale that takes the viewer on a journey and makes them second guess about traveling internationally. And, also, might give a person anxiety, or a heart attack with all the chest-clutching tension, and action that occurs throughout the film.

John David Washington plays Beckett, a regular everyman who is traveling through Greece with his girlfriend April, who is played by Alica Vikander. They decide to leave Athens early to avoid political unrest and visit the countryside. The two are madly in love and come off as the realistic portrayal of a late 20s couple that are partners, and that is refreshing. Tropes can make or break characters, but having them just be is one of the first act highlights that brings the viewers into their world.

Photos courtesy of Neflix
Beckett, played by John David Washington, takes photos with his girlfriend April, played by Alicia Vikander. They’re on a vacation in Greece when things go awry.

While traveling to their next destination the couple makes the unfortunate decision to travel late in the evening, triggering a devastating chain reaction that will change their lives forever.

Filomarino loves to toy with viewers by doing things such as placing a mouse into a snake den, conveying a sense of dread and hopelessness. He punishes characters for being at the wrong place at the wrong time, leaving audiences to question if it’s atonement for being tired and careless. Movies live and die by their leads, and no one knows this more than Washington, son of veteran Hollywood A-list actor Denzel Washington. Washington, coming off the critically panned love story “Malcolm & Marie,” makes it his business to prove to the world that he made it to the big screen due to his acting chops and not nepotism. He gives the performance of a lifetime as the unfortunate Beckett.  

Beckett tries to find his way out of Greece during a political uprising.

Washington made sure to humanize the character by making him a man just trying to survive the unfortunate, and not being a superhero. Beckett makes mistakes that have the viewer feeling sorry for him. He’s just one man caught into a web of deceit that no one deserves.

Award-winning Cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom captures the open countryside of Greece’s haunting beauty while capturing the pressure of claustrophobic action scenes in Athens amid political unrest during a protest that turns violent. The editing feels satisfying and cohesive, keeping the audience engaged thanks to editor Walter Fasano.

The only gripe one could have with the movie is the slow first act, but that’s only for those who suffer from a short attention span. But those who eat delicious barbecue know you can’t rush a brisket; it’s a process to achieve greatness, and that Beckett does graciously.

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