The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Words should be chosen wisely, used freely

VIEWPOINT
By Karen Gavis/editor-in-chief

Words are powerful and can be used in a variety of ways or not at all. However, in a free society whether a person speaks or not is still a matter of personal choice. Generally, the less a person says the better off they are, but if one is demanded to cork it, that changes things.

It is usually bullies who try to intimidate others into silence so they can dominate and control. Sometimes, all they need to do is glare, and others know they best not utter a word.

I loathe bullies.

It reminds me of the story about a kid who kept getting knocked down on the school bus by a bully. Each time, he would get back up. Finally, the other kid, who was bigger, sat on him to keep him down. Not having sufficient stature or physical strength to overcome the obstacle, the kid being bullied used his voice.

“I’m still standing up on the inside,” he said.

Freedom of speech is vital to guard against tyranny and oppression. It is not always easy to speak openly about issues that are important, especially if there is opposition. But the alternative is no change. America would be very different today if not for freedom of speech.

The words we choose to speak can offer encouragement or harm and have long-lasting effects. Some use their words to mock or belittle others. This makes them somehow feel superior, even if in their eyes only. And some raise their voices to magnify controlling efforts, which seems to work rather well.

Once while buying an ice cream off the ice cream truck, a Doberman Pinscher, who lived next door and was known to bite, came galloping toward my son and me looking ready for action. I did what I assume any mother would do.

Sasquatch-like, I stomped the ground, gritted my teeth and gave the meanest look and roar that I could. To my surprise, the dog tucked tail and swiftly returned to the yard next door. My 3-year-old was unhappy because Pink Panther with the gummy-ball-eyes lay melting in the dirt. But I was happy because I had learned firsthand that it pays to stand your ground.

However we choose to use our voice, if at all, it is powerful. But again, that choice is ours.

Donate to The Collegian

Your donation will support the student journalists of Tarrant County College. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Collegian