The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Conservation discussed on SE

By Matthew McConathy/ reporter

What people reap into the earth, they are returned back, a conservationist said Oct. 2 on SE Campus.

In Backyard Conservation, Tamika Sanchez from the Natural Resources Conservation Service said conservation and preservation are vital to keeping the natural environment from being polluted. The natural resources that people use every day such as timber, water, solar energy, resource oil and fish are near depletion.

Sanchez emphasized using resources wisely because both natural causes of depletion such as droughts and wildfires mixed with man-made resources are causing depletion to the environment. The soil that farmers use takes up to 100 years to grow one inch of soil in nature, which is created by rocks, calcium, sand and volcanic material.

She gave four soil suggestions: armor the soil, minimize soil disturbance, grow a diversity of plants and select fertilizer based on the amount of nitrogen present in it.

Texas A&M can conduct soil tests to provide that information.

“Plant health equals soil microbe health,” she said.

For the location, people should choose plants that best fit the area’s rainfall and have plant pollinators such as bees and other insects, Sanchez advised. Without them, the process would be difficult and costly. Irrigation and watering plants should be refrained to mornings and evenings.

The USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service requires farmers to use the best of their resources within attainment zones.

“The land takes care of them by them taking care of the land,” she said.

Ecosystems are living organisms that require non-living organisms for their needs, mineral soil, water and air quality.

Student Linh Nguyen was among those attending the session.

“I learned about soil, and it’s interesting how plants rely on other organisms to survive,” she said after the presentation.

Sanchez, who has worked for the NRCS for three years, grew up in Joseph City, Arizona, a town known for its coal power plant pollution. It gave her the inspiration to pursue a cleaner environment, provide awareness of pollution and preserve nature.

“If we don’t take care of Mother Nature, she won’t take care of us,” Sanchez said.

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