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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Fashion designer’s passion project really hits

“I Know NIGO!” is the passion project of Japanese fashion designer Nigo. The album is filled with various artist such as Pharrell and Tyler, The Creator. Photo courtesy of Victor Victor Worldwide
“I Know NIGO!” is the passion project of Japanese fashion designer Nigo. The
album is filled with various artist such as Pharrell and Tyler, The Creator.
Photo courtesy of Victor Victor Worldwide

MICHAEL FOSTER-SANDERS
senior producer
michael-foster-sanders@my.tccd.edu

Contrary to popular belief, the streets dictate fashion. 

Don’t believe that all it takes to start a trend is for a designer fashion house to find the new urban trendsetter, grab them some of their pieces and pray they wear them, so attention is brought to the company. Doubly if it’s a rapper in a video letting the masses know what they’re ignorant of or what they need to be wearing.

Meanwhile, said rappers can’t get an official endorsement or discounted clothes for the plug into hip-hop culture. Culture Vulture mentality at its finest.

           Streetwear king Nigo, the creator of the Bape clothing company, sought to change this mentality by building a rapport with super-producer Pharrell Williams and his friends, such as Pusha T, who had a rap beef with Lil Wayne for trying to dress like them. 

         Fast forward a decade-plus, Nigo has sold the Bape brand and created the new brand, Human Made. To raise awareness of the brand, Nigo has enlisted his musician friends for the “I Know NIGO!” music compilation to show the world that Human Made is not just a clothing brand, but a lifestyle. 

With guest appearances from Lil Uzi Vert, A$AP Ferg and the late Pop Smoke, does Nigo have what it takes to pull off the ultimate vibe?

Starting up the experience is A$AP Rocky and Tyler the Creator’s “Lost and Found Freestyle,” where the tag-team duo suplexes two instrumentals from Slim Thug’s debut album produced by The Neptunes. Rocky delivers his unique down South, New York flow, weaving in and out the beat like a car going through oncoming traffic. Tyler, when the beat changes, reminds the world that he’s a rapper first and foremost, and violates those who would think differently.

“Arya,” the lead single from the project, has A$AP Rocky doing what he does best over a beat that’s described as a movie theme laid over thunderous 808 drums and classic A$AP ad-libs. Rocky gives a haunting performance, transforming into his alter ego Pretty Flacko, letting the audience know the world is his and theirs if they follow his blueprint for the art of being cool.

The Thornton brothers reunited after 13 years for “Punch Bowl,” and it’s a breath of fresh air for the kings of coke rap and helps reintroduce them to this new generation, showing that it’s always substance over flash. 

Malice bears the responsibility of being a big brother to his little brother’s reckless disregard that Pusha T has no issue displaying, like when he had his issue with Drake. Malice’s words of wisdom are a rarity that doesn’t come off as too preachy. He also does it without cursing, showing that a Christian rapper can spit just as well as a secular one.

“Functional Addict” brings Pharrell and Gunna together for an ode to the ladies about having the finest things. The song plays over a simple beat with repeating chords and heavenly reverb on the hook that will have all the pretty girls using it for TikTok videos this summer.

Moving to the party side of the tape, we have Kid Cudi contributing with “Want It bad.” It has a rooftop party vibe with a pulsating beat that’s going to get booties wiggling. The Teriyaki Boyz brings “Morë Tonight,” a swanky international jam for sweaty club vibes.

The highlight of the tape is Pusha T’s “Hear Me Clearly.” It serves as a warning shot for his upcoming album “It’s Almost Dry.” Pusha shows why he wants respect over fame with razor-sharp bars aimed at anyone who dares to challenge his lyrical ability. It’s why he’s still in the hip-hop game after 20 years.

Nigo knows how to curate a vibe, and this tape is definitely one for the books. Press play and lose yourself in it.

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