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The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

The Student News Site of Tarrant County College

The Collegian

Production brings comedy to horror formula

 

Joel Solis/The Collegian Actors Trey Kelly and Sadie rehearse for the opening night of “Slasher” April 12.
Joel Solis/The Collegian
Actors Trey Kelly and Sadie rehearse for the opening night of “Slasher” April 12.

JUAN SALINAS II
senior editor
juan.salinas465@my.tccd.edu

NW theater is putting a twist on the horror genre by adding comedy to the mix with its rendition of the play “Slasher” by Allison Moore. 

The play opens April 20 and will run until April 23. General admission is $6, but $3 for non-TCC students and seniors. TCC students and faculty get in for free. The performance starts at 7:30 p.m., except for Saturday since it begins at 2 p.m at the NW WTLO. 

“The play is about a young woman who gets hired to play the ‘last girl’ in a film called ‘Bloodbath,’” actor Trey Kelly said. 

Sheena, played by actor Madison Hale, thinks it’s the big break she’s been waiting for, but news of the movie angers her feminist mother to the point that she will do anything to stop the movie’s filming. 

“There is some twist with people’s internal monologues,” actor Hannah Bell said.  “You get to see a horror movie being shot, but you also notice little dark things happening in the household.” 

“Slasher” isn’t tied to any class credit, so the actors use their spare time to practice and prepare for opening night. 

“For me personally, I really like the description of the play, ‘a horrifying comedy,’”  actor Lillie Galvan said. “I heard there was going to be a lot of blood, and that really intrigued me.” 

Students from the stagecraft class volunteered to do the blood for the play. Stage manager Casey Nail said the students did a ton of research to figure out the right mixture. 

Even though the play is a comedy, it deals with mature themes. The NW theater hasn’t done something this real before, according to Kelly. 

“Francis has a bit of a drug problem, and this is one of the most intense roles that I played,” Galvan said. “This one is very real, and it hits close to home, so it’s kinda fun to pull from those experiences.” 

Kelly said the characters aren’t caricatures. They’re written like real people the audience could relate to. 

“There are three main scenes that will keep you on the edge of your seat and just pull at your heartstrings,” Bell said. 

Normally, the audience would be behind the stage, but they will be up close and personal with the actors for this production. 

“We want you to feel the tension and feel every emotion,” Bell said. 

The play is set around 2009, so the costumes worn by the actors aren’t usually associated with theater productions. 

“I like my costume because I get to wear just a T-shirt, sweatpants and a robe,” Galvan said. 

Bell expressed how some of the costumes will make the audience laugh. 

“One of the T-shirts said ‘Anything you can do, I can do bleeding,’ which is my favorite one,” Galvan said. 

Galvan is also the assistant costume designer and helps ensure every costume is accurate to the time. 

 Nail said the play is like watching a horror movie that is more funny than scary. 

“Y’all should come see it,” Bell said. “We put our blood, sweat and tears into this. Well, not our real blood.”

NW theater is putting a twist on the horror genre by adding comedy to the mix with its rendition of the play “Slasher” by Allison Moore. 

The play opens April 20 and will run until April 23. General admission is $6, but $3 for non-TCC students and seniors. TCC students and faculty get in for free. The performance starts at 7:30 p.m., except for Saturday since it begins at 2 p.m at the NW WTLO. 

“The play is about a young woman who gets hired to play the ‘last girl’ in a film called ‘Bloodbath,’” actor Trey Kelly said. 

Sheena, played by actor Madison Hale, thinks it’s the big break she’s been waiting for, but news of the movie angers her feminist mother to the point that she will do anything to stop the movie’s filming. 

“There is some twist with people’s internal monologues,” actor Hannah Bell said.  “You get to see a horror movie being shot, but you also notice little dark things happening in the household.” 

“Slasher” isn’t tied to any class credit, so the actors use their spare time to practice and prepare for opening night. 

“For me personally, I really like the description of the play, ‘a horrifying comedy,’”  actor Lillie Galvan said. “I heard there was going to be a lot of blood, and that really intrigued me.” 

Students from the stagecraft class volunteered to do the blood for the play. Stage manager Casey Nail said the students did a ton of research to figure out the right mixture. 

Even though the play is a comedy, it deals with mature themes. The NW theater hasn’t done something this real before, according to Kelly. 

“Francis has a bit of a drug problem, and this is one of the most intense roles that I played,” Galvan said. “This one is very real, and it hits close to home, so it’s kinda fun to pull from those experiences.” 

Kelly said the characters aren’t caricatures. They’re written like real people the audience could relate to. 

“There are three main scenes that will keep you on the edge of your seat and just pull at your heartstrings,” Bell said. 

Normally, the audience would be behind the stage, but they will be up close and personal with the actors for this production. 

“We want you to feel the tension and feel every emotion,” Bell said. 

The play is set around 2009, so the costumes worn by the actors aren’t usually associated with theater productions. 

“I like my costume because I get to wear just a T-shirt, sweatpants and a robe,” Galvan said. 

Bell expressed how some of the costumes will make the audience laugh. 

“One of the T-shirts said ‘Anything you can do, I can do bleeding,’ which is my favorite one,” Galvan said. 

Galvan is also the assistant costume designer and helps ensure every costume is accurate to the time. 

 Nail said the play is like watching a horror movie that is more funny than scary. 

“Y’all should come see it,” Bell said. “We put our blood, sweat and tears into this. Well, not our real blood.”

NW theater is putting a twist on the horror genre by adding comedy to the mix with its rendition of the play “Slasher” by Allison Moore. 

The play opens April 20 and will run until April 23. General admission is $6, but $3 for non-TCC students and seniors. TCC students and faculty get in for free. The performance starts at 7:30 p.m., except for Saturday since it begins at 2 p.m at the NW WTLO. 

“The play is about a young woman who gets hired to play the ‘last girl’ in a film called ‘Bloodbath,’” actor Trey Kelly said. 

Sheena, played by actor Madison Hale, thinks it’s the big break she’s been waiting for, but news of the movie angers her feminist mother to the point that she will do anything to stop the movie’s filming. 

“There is some twist with people’s internal monologues,” actor Hannah Bell said.  “You get to see a horror movie being shot, but you also notice little dark things happening in the household.” 

“Slasher” isn’t tied to any class credit, so the actors use their spare time to practice and prepare for opening night. 

“For me personally, I really like the description of the play, ‘a horrifying comedy,’”  actor Lillie Galvan said. “I heard there was going to be a lot of blood, and that really intrigued me.” 

Students from the stagecraft class volunteered to do the blood for the play. Stage manager Casey Nail said the students did a ton of research to figure out the right mixture. 

Even though the play is a comedy, it deals with mature themes. The NW theater hasn’t done something this real before, according to Kelly. 

“Francis has a bit of a drug problem, and this is one of the most intense roles that I played,” Galvan said. “This one is very real, and it hits close to home, so it’s kinda fun to pull from those experiences.” 

Kelly said the characters aren’t caricatures. They’re written like real people the audience could relate to. 

“There are three main scenes that will keep you on the edge of your seat and just pull at your heartstrings,” Bell said. 

Normally, the audience would be behind the stage, but they will be up close and personal with the actors for this production. 

“We want you to feel the tension and feel every emotion,” Bell said. 

The play is set around 2009, so the costumes worn by the actors aren’t usually associated with theater productions. 

“I like my costume because I get to wear just a T-shirt, sweatpants and a robe,” Galvan said. 

Bell expressed how some of the costumes will make the audience laugh. 

“One of the T-shirts said ‘Anything you can do, I can do bleeding,’ which is my favorite one,” Galvan said. 

Galvan is also the assistant costume designer and helps ensure every costume is accurate to the time. 

 Nail said the play is like watching a horror movie that is more funny than scary. 

“Y’all should come see it,” Bell said. “We put our blood, sweat and tears into this. Well, not our real blood.”

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